Welcome

inflame-group

Context:
The rising burden of non-communicable diseases (NCDs) now poses the greatest threat to global health. Inflammation is a common element in almost all these diseases, including obesity, allergies, asthma, autoimmune disorders, cardiovascular and metabolic diseases, cancer, and neurodegenerative conditions. A substantial component of the risk of all NCDs is programmed in early life, and early environmental effects on the developing immune system play an especially important role in promoting inflammation with lifelong consequences for many organ systems.

The network:
To tackle the problem, we formed in-FLAME, the International Inflammation Network in 2012. This is an interdisciplinary collaboration (currently comprising 125 experts across 19 countries) dedicated to understanding the risk factors for inflammation and devising strategies to prevent them, particularly in early life. The inflame network is a sub-group of the global health division of the World Universities Network (WUN)

philosophies

General  goals of  the in-FLAME network:

  • This  network  addresses  the  risk  factors,  pathways  and  strategies  to  overcome  the  rising propensity  for  chronic  inflammatory  disorders  with  a  focus  on  early  effects  on  the  developing immune  system  and  the consequences  of inflammation  in  early  life  for  the  health  and  function of  many  organ  systems.
  • We  address  the  risk   factors,   pathways   and   strategies to  overcome the broad   range   of   inter-­related conditions that  are  associated  with  inflammation  in  early  life  and  throughout  the  life course  including obesity,   allergy,   asthma, autoimmune   disorders, cardiovascular and   metabolic   diseases,   cancer,   and neurodegenerative  conditions.
  • Our  global  network brings  together  a  diverse  interdisciplinary  group  (across  many  systems) tasked with developing an   integrated program of population studies, biological studies and intervention studies ultimately  aimed  at  preventing  inflammation  and  the  burden  of  subsequent disease.

If you would like access to the password protected pages
please contact Celina Aspinall